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PHACES association

PHACES association is the name given to a collection of features that are often seen together. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the medical condition PHACES association (previously referred to as PHACES syndrome) and what to expect when a child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula

Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a rare condition where a short section at the top of the oesophagus (gullet or foodpipe) has not formed properly so is not connected to the stomach. This means food cannot pass from the throat to the stomach. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) is another rare condition, which tends to occur alongside oesophageal atresia. This is where part of the oesophagus is joined to the trachea (windpipe). This page explains about oesophageal atresia and tracheooesophageal fistula, how they are treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Subglottic stenosis

The subglottis is just below the vocal cords at the bottom of the voice box (larynx). It is the narrowest part of a child’s airway. Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the subglottic airway. Doctors do not know how many children are affected by subglottic stenosis, but we see around 200 children with the condition each year at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).