Search Results

Gastrostomy management

A gastrostomy is a feeding tube that is inserted directly into the stomach either surgically under direct vision (open or laproscopic), endoscopically (with a camera), or radiologically (x-ray guidance). A gastrostomy tube allows the delivery of supplemental nutrition and medications directly into the stomach. It also provides a mechanism to drain gastric contents if required. In order for gastrostomy feeding to be successful the child or young person must have a functioning gastrointestinal tract.

Gastroscopy

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the gastroscopy procedure, what it involves and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for treatment. You may also hear the procedure called an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or OGD.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux

When a baby or child has gastro-oesophageal reflux, the food and drink travels down the foodpipe as normal. However, some of the mixture of food, drink and acid travels back up the foodpipe, instead of passing through to the large and small intestines. As the food and drink is mixed with acid from the stomach, it can irritate the lining of the foodpipe, making it sore. This is gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Research and publications from the Psychological Medicine Service and National Tourette Syndrome Clinic

We have an ongoing programme of research, and you or your child may be invited to take part in a research project whilst under the care of the team. This is always entirely voluntary, and whether you choose to participate or not, your clinical care will not be affected. Any information gathered may be used anonymously for research purposes to improve our understanding and lead to better treatments for other children and families in the future.

Wellcome Trust funding success for research into stem cells, gut disorders and the genetics of childhood conditions

Prestigious Collaborative Award and Seed Award funding from the Wellcome Trust has been awarded to researchers at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH). The awards will support pioneering laboratory-based research which will help shed light on the underlying genetic and molecular causes of rare childhood conditions.

Pages