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Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

UK-wide consortium to transform treatment for children and young people with arthritis and uveitis

Researchers from the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) will lead a UK-wide effort to drive the development of new, targeted treatments for children and young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and its associated eye-inflammation condition, uveitis.

Central venous access devices (long term)

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance on the care and use of long term Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD) including advice on dealing with any problems encountered. For the purpose of this guideline, devices that are required to remain insitu greater than a month will be considered a long term CVAD.

Note: While this guideline refers to the 'child' throughout, all activities are applicable to young people

Warfarin

Warfarin is an anticoagulant medication (known as a ‘blood thinner’) that will slow down blood clotting to prevent abnormal blood clots from developing or worsening. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the anticoagulant (blood thinner) medication warfarin, how it should be taken and how it will be monitored. 

Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Neuropathic pain medicines

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat neuropathic pain – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

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