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Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Neuropathic pain medicines

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat neuropathic pain – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

Corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions

Corticosteroids are hormonal substances that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. There are many different types of corticosteroids and they have different effects on the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the use of corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions, how they are given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from the side effects mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Ajmaline provocation test

This page explains about ajmaline provocation tests, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the test. An ajmaline provocation test is carried out to diagnose a specific condition called Brugada syndrome.

Diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions

This information should be read in conjunction with any patient information leaflet provided by the manufacturer.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions, which are usually prescribed together. It explains how they are given and some of their side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist or telephone one of the contact numbers.

Oral sirolimus to treat vascular problems

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about sirolimus (also known as rapamycin) oral solution and tablets, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned. This information sheet describes how sirolimus is used to treat vascular problems – for use in other specialties, please see our other information sheets. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist or telephone one of the contact numbers on the information sheet.

Lanreotide injections

Lanreotide is used to treat persistently low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) caused by the body producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinism). This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes lanreotide injections, how they are given and some of its side effects.

Bone SPECT/CT scans

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about bone scans, how it is used to look at your child’s bones, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

Lung transplant

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for parents of children and young people undergoing assessment for possible lung or heart-lung transplantation. A transplant is a serious operation and is not without risk. A transplant can be the only effective treatment option for certain serious lung diseases; however, it is not a cure. In many situations transplantation can lead to an extension of life with improved quality.

Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.