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Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Open tip rhinoplasty for children with craniofacial disorders

The bridge of the nose is made of bone but the rest of the nose is a flexible tissue called cartilage. A rhinoplasty is an operation to reshape the bone and cartilage in the nose. An open tip rhinoplasty is one where incisions are made to access inside the nostrils. Nose re-shaping is common in children with craniofacial conditions as their nose may be ‘beaked’ or skewed to one side. Some children may have a bifid (split) nose. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the open tip rhinoplasty operation for children with craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards. 

Orbital box osteotomy

Orbital box osteotomy is an operation used to correct abnormal eye socket shape or placement. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called orbital box osteotomy, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards. 

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards. 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 

Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic condition present from birth. Its primary feature is fractures usually caused by minimal impact. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), what causes it and how it can be managed. It also tells you about the highly specialised service for OI based at GOSH.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.