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UK-wide consortium to transform treatment for children and young people with arthritis and uveitis

Researchers from the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) will lead a UK-wide effort to drive the development of new, targeted treatments for children and young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and its associated eye-inflammation condition, uveitis.

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis is a common type of chest infection that tends to affect babies and young children under a year old. Although many bronchiolitis infections get better without treatment, a small number of children will need treatment in hospital, occasionally in the intensive care unit.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of bronchiolitis and where to get help.

Intracranial dermoid cysts

A dermoid cyst is a sac-like growth that is present at birth, containing structures such as hair, fluid, teeth or skin glands. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of intracranial (inside the skull) dermoid cysts and where to get help. 

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex: generalised severe type 

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is the term used to describe a number of rare genetic conditions which cause the skin to blister and shear in response to minimal friction and trauma. There are four broad categories of EB: EB simplex, junctional EB, dystrophic EB and Kindler syndrome. Within each of these categories there are several subtypes. One of the subtypes of EB simplex is the generalised severe type (previously known as Dowling Meara type).