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Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

Refeeding guidelines for children and young people with feeding and eating disorders admitted to the Mildred Creak Unit at Great Ormond Street Hospital

Clinical guideline from Great Ormond Street Hospital for the recognition, prevention and treatment of the refeeding syndrome in children and young people admitted in the Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health who have experienced recent starvation. 

Tissue removed during heart surgery is saving lives of children with no immune system

In a European first, a little-known gland called the ‘thymus’, some of which is routinely removed during cardiac surgery, has saved the lives of children with a life threatening immunodeficiency condition, complete DiGeorge syndrome (cDGS).

A new, genetic diagnostic service for ciliopathy disorders has been launched

In a collaboration between Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) North-East Thames Regional Genetics and the UCL Institute of Child Health, a new genetic diagnostic service for ciliopathy disorders has been launched for service delivery to the NHS.

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