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Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

Sturge-Weber syndrome

A syndrome is a collection of signs that are often seen together. Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a condition affecting the skin, brain and eyes. It is named after the doctors who described it in the late 19th century and early 20th century.

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery is not actually a type of surgery at all – instead of opening the skull to remove a tumour or lesion, it is treated through the skin and skull using gamma radiation beams.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about Gamma Knife® (also known as stereotactic radiosurgery), when it can be used and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Orbital box osteotomy

Orbital box osteotomy is an operation used to correct abnormal eye socket shape or placement. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called orbital box osteotomy, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Myelomeningocele

Myelomeningocele is a type of spina bifida. This is when the neural tube has failed to close and the neural tissue is exposed on the baby’s back. The myelomeningocele will look like a sac sticking out from a baby’s back. 

Anorectal anomaly

An anorectal anomaly is a disorder affecting the anus and the rectum, the last part of the digestive system.This page explains about anorectal anomaly, how it can be treated and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Closed spinal dysraphism

In early development, the brain and spinal cord start as a tube-like structure called the ‘neural tube’ that is open at either end. These openings close within the first weeks of pregnancy, and the neural tube continues to grow and fold, eventually forming the brain and spinal cord.

Headache

Headaches affect people of all ages – many adults remember having headaches as children. Headache in children can occur on its own (primary disorder) or as a result of another condition.

HIV

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a blood-borne virus that attacks the body’s immune system. It is a life-long condition that can lead to AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome).