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When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

Ketogenic diet

The ketogenic diet (KD) is a therapeutic diet, which has been shown to improve seizure control in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, and is used in some patients with metabolic conditions for example, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1) and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH).

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Gastrostomy management

A gastrostomy is a feeding tube that is inserted directly into the stomach either surgically under direct vision (open or laproscopic), endoscopically (with a camera), or radiologically (x-ray guidance). A gastrostomy tube allows the delivery of supplemental nutrition and medications directly into the stomach. It also provides a mechanism to drain gastric contents if required. In order for gastrostomy feeding to be successful the child or young person must have a functioning gastrointestinal tract.

Central venous access devices (long term)

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance on the care and use of long term Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD) including advice on dealing with any problems encountered. For the purpose of this guideline, devices that are required to remain insitu greater than a month will be considered a long term CVAD.

Note: While this guideline refers to the 'child' throughout, all activities are applicable to young people

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.