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Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

Sir Michael Rake appointed Chairman of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust

Sir Michael Rake, currently Chairman of the BT Group plc, has been appointed as the new Chairman of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust and will take up the position in November 2017.

When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Skin biopsy: punch method

The skin is complex with an array of functions. It is the body’s largest organ, protecting the deeper tissues and organs from mechanical damage, chemical damage, bacterial damage, ultraviolet radiation and thermal damage. The skin aids in regulating body temperature, in excretion of urea and uric acid and also synthesis of vitamin D (Marieb 2012). 

Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological (brain) condition. The main signs of TS are motor and vocal tics. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains some basic facts about Tourette Syndrome (TS). 

Research at the National Centre for High Functioning Autism

The clinical team at GOSH works closely with the research department at the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit (BBSU) at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH). We collaborate with colleagues around the world to try and understand the genetic, psychological and neurophysiological basis of disorders on the autism spectrum. All information we obtain in terms of interview, observation and other investigations is compiled into anonymised computerised files. From our database of nearly 2000 children, we are able to compare a child’s problems with others seen in our clinic and can look for similarities and differences. For research purposes, we usually ask parents to donate DNA samples too. 

Isotretinoin

Isotretinoin is a retinoid, which is a type of Vitamin A. It is commonly used for the treatment of severe acne. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what isotretinoin acid is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects.

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders.

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