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Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurological (brain) condition. The main signs of TS are motor and vocal tics. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains some basic facts about Tourette Syndrome (TS). 

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the two doctors who described it in the mid-20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and where to get help.

Nager syndrome

Nager syndrome is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and tissues in the face. It also affects the arms and hands, and occasionally the legs and feet too. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Nager syndrome and where to get help.

Carpenter syndrome

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Carpenter syndrome (also known as acrocephalopolysyndactyly type 2 or ACPS II) and where to get help. Carpenter syndrome is a type of craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described the condition.

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome and where to get help.

Brugada syndrome

Brugada syndrome is an inherited condition caused by a change in a person’s DNA. People with Brugada syndrome have changes in the microscopic structure of individual heart muscle cells – these changes affect the way that electrical impulses are able to pass through the heart. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the medical condition Brugada syndrome, what causes it and where to get help.

Muenke syndrome

Muenke syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the mid-1990s. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Muenke syndrome (also known as FGFR3 associated craniosynostosis or P250arg mutation) and where to get help.

Parry-Romburg syndrome

Parry-Romburg syndrome (also known as Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy) is a rare condition affecting the skin and soft tissues on one side of the face (hemifacial). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Parry-Romburg syndrome and where to get help.

Treacher-Collins syndrome

Treacher-Collins syndrome is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and tissues in the face. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Treacher-Collins syndrome (also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis) and where to get help.

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

Landau Kleffner Syndrome: language and communication

Children with Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) experience a significant regression in their understanding and use of spoken language. This loss of skills often occurs at the onset of the disease and can be the first sign for families that something is wrong. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) can affect a child’s language skills and outlines recommendations for input and support.

When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome is the name given to a condition characterised by blue marks on the skin and internal organs caused by abnormal veins. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the causes, symptoms and treatment of blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome and where to get help.

Research at the National Centre for High Functioning Autism

The clinical team at GOSH works closely with the research department at the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit (BBSU) at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH). We collaborate with colleagues around the world to try and understand the genetic, psychological and neurophysiological basis of disorders on the autism spectrum. All information we obtain in terms of interview, observation and other investigations is compiled into anonymised computerised files. From our database of nearly 2000 children, we are able to compare a child’s problems with others seen in our clinic and can look for similarities and differences. For research purposes, we usually ask parents to donate DNA samples too. 

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