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Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA)

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA) – previously known as lymphangiomatosis – is the name given to a rare, congenital (present at birth), and progressive disorder of lymphatic channels which can affect different organs including the bones and the intestines. It can cause problems if the abnormal lymphatic tissue develops within important tissues and structures. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of generalised lymphatic anomalies (GLA) and where to get help. 

Parry-Romburg syndrome

Parry-Romburg syndrome (also known as Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy) is a rare condition affecting the skin and soft tissues on one side of the face (hemifacial). This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Parry-Romburg syndrome and where to get help.

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders.

Orbital box osteotomy

Orbital box osteotomy is an operation used to correct abnormal eye socket shape or placement. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called orbital box osteotomy, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome

Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome is the name given to a condition characterised by blue marks on the skin and internal organs caused by abnormal veins. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the causes, symptoms and treatment of blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome and where to get help.

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Hepatitis B

‘Hepatitis’ means inflammation of the liver – this inflammation can occur for many reasons, one of which is viral infection. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of hepatitis B in children and where to get help.

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery is not actually a type of surgery at all – instead of opening the skull to remove a tumour or lesion, it is treated through the skin and skull using gamma radiation beams.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about Gamma Knife® (also known as stereotactic radiosurgery), when it can be used and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XIII deficiency and where to get help.