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Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Neuropathic pain medicines

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat neuropathic pain – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

Corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions

Corticosteroids are hormonal substances that are produced naturally in the body by the adrenal glands (which are just above each kidney) and by the reproductive organs. There are many different types of corticosteroids and they have different effects on the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the use of corticosteroids to treat immune-mediated neurological conditions, how they are given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer from the side effects mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Oral sirolimus to treat vascular problems

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about sirolimus (also known as rapamycin) oral solution and tablets, how it is given and some of the possible side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines, so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned. This information sheet describes how sirolimus is used to treat vascular problems – for use in other specialties, please see our other information sheets. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist or telephone one of the contact numbers on the information sheet.

Bone SPECT/CT scans

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about bone scans, how it is used to look at your child’s bones, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

Factor V deficiency

Factor V deficiency (also occasionally known as Owren’s disease or parahaemophilia) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor V deficiency and where to get help. 

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medication - safe handling and administration

The term cytotoxic drug is used to refer to all drugs with direct anti-tumour activity including anti-cancer drugs, monoclonal antibodies, partially targeted treatments and immunosuppressive drugs. 

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Gallstones

Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operation to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).

Factor XI deficiency

Factor XI deficiency (also known as Haemophilia C, plasma thromboplastin antecedent deficiency or Rosenthal syndrome) is a clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XI deficiency and where to get help.

Embolisation

Embolisation is a way of blocking abnormal blood vessels. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about embolisation, why it might be suggested and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for treatment. 

DMSA scan

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the DMSA scan used to look at your child’s kidneys, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.