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Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

Isotretinoin

Isotretinoin is a retinoid, which is a type of Vitamin A. It is commonly used for the treatment of severe acne. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains what isotretinoin acid is, how it is given and some of the possible side effects.

Research at the National Centre for High Functioning Autism

The clinical team at GOSH works closely with the research department at the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit (BBSU) at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH). We collaborate with colleagues around the world to try and understand the genetic, psychological and neurophysiological basis of disorders on the autism spectrum. All information we obtain in terms of interview, observation and other investigations is compiled into anonymised computerised files. From our database of nearly 2000 children, we are able to compare a child’s problems with others seen in our clinic and can look for similarities and differences. For research purposes, we usually ask parents to donate DNA samples too. 

Orbital box osteotomy

Orbital box osteotomy is an operation used to correct abnormal eye socket shape or placement. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called orbital box osteotomy, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders.

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Open tip rhinoplasty for children with craniofacial disorders

A rhinoplasty is an operation to reshape the bone and cartilage in the nose. An open tip rhinoplasty is one where incisions are made to access inside the nostrils. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the open tip rhinoplasty operation for children with craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

If your child has additional needs

We want every child and young person to have the best experience possible when visiting or staying at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). We will always try to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ for children and young people with additional needs – for example, considering a child’s needs when allocating single cubicles, finalising theatre list order or planning outpatient appointments. 

Factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII deficiency is a type of clotting disorder. A specific protein is missing from the blood so that injured blood vessels cannot heal in the usual way. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Factor XIII deficiency and where to get help.

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery

Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery is not actually a type of surgery at all – instead of opening the skull to remove a tumour or lesion, it is treated through the skin and skull using gamma radiation beams.This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about Gamma Knife® (also known as stereotactic radiosurgery), when it can be used and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

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