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Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.

Head injury in children

Children are incredibly active and they have little sense of danger so it is not surprising that they are prone to head injuries. In addition, their heads are large in proportion to their bodies and therefore more vulnerable to damage than adult heads. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the effects that a head injury can have on a child. It also sets out the treatment and care of any complications following a head injury.

Arrhythmias

Arrhythmias are abnormal heart rhythms, which can prevent the heart pumping efficiently. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how the heart beats normally, what happens when it starts to beat abnormally and how it can be treated.

Toe to hand transfer

This page explains about the toe to hand transfer operation which can be used to create a new digit for children who have short or missing fingers. It also
outlines what you can expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Warfarin

Warfarin is an anticoagulant medication (known as a ‘blood thinner’) that will slow down blood clotting to prevent abnormal blood clots from developing or worsening. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the anticoagulant (blood thinner) medication warfarin, how it should be taken and how it will be monitored. 

Lung transplant

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for parents of children and young people undergoing assessment for possible lung or heart-lung transplantation. A transplant is a serious operation and is not without risk. A transplant can be the only effective treatment option for certain serious lung diseases; however, it is not a cure. In many situations transplantation can lead to an extension of life with improved quality.

Ambrisentan

Ambrisentan belongs to a group of medicines called ‘endothelin receptor antagonists’. It is prescribed at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to treat pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the blood vessels in the lungs).

Halo vest system

The halo vest system protects the cervical spine (the bones in the neck) from any damaging movement t the bones that allows the bones to heal following injury or surgery. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the halo vest system and how to care for your child when you return home.
 

Pneumonia

Pneumonia can affect one or both lungs. It is nearly always due to an infection, caused by either bacteria or viruses, and can make a child very unwell.