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Craniofacial discharge

Your child has recently had craniofacial surgery. We are happy that your child has now recovered from their operation and is ready to go home.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is designed to give you the advice and support you need when you take your child home. 

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy and clinical trials

When Emma’s son Sam was three he was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a life-limiting condition which causes the breakdown and loss of muscle cells. Here, Emma shares her experience of having a child with DMD, and what it’s like to take part in a clinical trial at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Duchenne muscular dystrophy and clinical trials

When Emma’s son Sam was three he was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a life-limiting condition which causes the breakdown and loss of muscle cells. Here, Emma shares her experience of having a child with DMD, and what it’s like to take part in a clinical trial at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

Tuberculosis (TB): care of the child and protection of staff and patients

This guideline describes the procedure which must be followed whenever a diagnosis of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) infection is suspected or confirmed, to optimally protect staff, patients and other visitors from risk of infection and assist in the care of the child with M.TB (not including Occupational Health policy).

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

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