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Coming to hospital soon after birth

This page has been written to explain about coming to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) soon after your baby’s birth and what support you can expect when you stay here. Whether the transfer was planned or not, you are bound to feel overwhelmed by all that you are feeling. We hope that this information sheet gives you some useful tips and suggestions.

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy and clinical trials

When Emma’s son Sam was three he was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a life-limiting condition which causes the breakdown and loss of muscle cells. Here, Emma shares her experience of having a child with DMD, and what it’s like to take part in a clinical trial at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Duchenne muscular dystrophy and clinical trials

When Emma’s son Sam was three he was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a life-limiting condition which causes the breakdown and loss of muscle cells. Here, Emma shares her experience of having a child with DMD, and what it’s like to take part in a clinical trial at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Head injury in children

Children are incredibly active and they have little sense of danger so it is not surprising that they are prone to head injuries. In addition, their heads are large in proportion to their bodies and therefore more vulnerable to damage than adult heads. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the effects that a head injury can have on a child. It also sets out the treatment and care of any complications following a head injury.

Your child is having an MRI scan under intravenous sedation

MRI is short for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This means that rather than using x-rays, the scan uses a strong magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to take very detailed pictures of inside the body. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about having a magnetic resonance imaging scan under intravenous sedation, how to prepare for it and what care your child will need afterwards.

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