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Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA)

Generalised lymphatic anomaly (GLA) – previously known as lymphangiomatosis – is the name given to a rare, congenital (present at birth), and progressive disorder of lymphatic channels which can affect different organs including the bones and the intestines. It can cause problems if the abnormal lymphatic tissue develops within important tissues and structures. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of generalised lymphatic anomalies (GLA) and where to get help. 

Idiopathic scoliosis and spinal surgery

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes and symptoms of idiopathic scoliosis (curvature of the spine from an unknown cause). Surgery to correct the curvature is the main form of treatment offered at GOSH, so this pack gives details of the assessment process to help decide if spinal surgery is right for your child. It also tells you what to expect when your child comes to GOSH.

Head injury in children

Children are incredibly active and they have little sense of danger so it is not surprising that they are prone to head injuries. In addition, their heads are large in proportion to their bodies and therefore more vulnerable to damage than adult heads. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the effects that a head injury can have on a child. It also sets out the treatment and care of any complications following a head injury.

Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID. It is designed to help answer the questions families may have about the immune condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Landau Kleffner syndrome

Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare epilepsy. It occurs in children usually between the ages of three and nine years and is characterised by loss of language skills and silent electrical seizures during sleep. It may be associated with convulsive seizures and additional difficulties with behaviour, social interaction, motor skills and learning. It is not usually life-threatening, but can impact greatly on quality of life unless it responds well to treatment. It occurs in approximately one child in a million. The disease is more common in boys and does not usually run in families.