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Your child is having an MRI scan using 'feed and wrap' technique

An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses a magnetic field rather than X-rays to take pictures of your child’s body. The MRI scanner is a hollow machine with a tube running horizontally through its middle. ‘Feed and wrap’ is a technique used with young babies instead of sedation or general anaesthesia. Generally, babies tend to fall asleep after a feed, so we take advantage of this and scan them while asleep.

Port wine stains

A port wine stain is a vascular birthmark caused by abnormal development of blood vessels in the skin. A port wine stain is sometimes referred to as a capillary malformation.This page explains about port wine stains and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital for treatment.

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders.

Orbital box osteotomy

Orbital box osteotomy is an operation used to correct abnormal eye socket shape or placement. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called orbital box osteotomy, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Ajmaline provocation test

This page explains about ajmaline provocation tests, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the test. An ajmaline provocation test is carried out to diagnose a specific condition called Brugada syndrome.

People

Browse our photo gallery to learn about some of the characters who have helped shape Great Ormond Street Hospital's history.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux

When a baby or child has gastro-oesophageal reflux, the food and drink travels down the foodpipe as normal. However, some of the mixture of food, drink and acid travels back up the foodpipe, instead of passing through to the large and small intestines. As the food and drink is mixed with acid from the stomach, it can irritate the lining of the foodpipe, making it sore. This is gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiency

This booklet has been produced jointly between PID UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It is designed to help answer the questions that families may have about the genetic aspects of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). The information has been reviewed by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel and by families affected by PID but should not replace advice from a clinical immunologist or a geneticist.

Pete Sweeney, Assistant Services Manager, for Neurology, Epilepsy and Neurophysiology

We asked Pete a series of questions to get a sense of his administration and clerical career path, what it's like working in a busy specialist children's hospital as an assistant services manager, his achievements and the advice Pete would pass on to others considering Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) as future place of work. Read Pete's answers.

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

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