General medical conditions

Use the search box to learn about general medical conditions that affect children and young people.

Click here for information about specialist medical conditions, which are treated at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Lice

Head lice are tiny brown insects that can only live on human hair. They survive by sucking blood from the scalp. Head lice are easily spread by close contact, but do not spread disease.

Polio

Polio is an infectious disease caused by any one of the three types of polio virus. In the UK, immunisation is automatically offered to everyone as a baby.

Tooth plaque

Plaque is a soft sticky deposit that continually forms on each of the tooth surfaces. It contains many types of bacteria (germs). It affects everybody, regardless of age.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about tooth
plaque.

Tooth abscess

A tooth abscess is a collection of pus caused by a bacterial infection. It can form on the inside of the tooth (a periapical abscess) or the surrounding gum (a periodontal abscess).

MRSA

MRSA is short for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusS. aureus is a bacterium (bug or germ) that about 30 per cent of us carry on our skin or in our nose without knowing about it. This is called 'colonisation'. This page explains about MRSA, how it is passed on and how it can be treated.It also explains about things we are doing at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to reduce the chance of it spreading.

Raynaud’s phenomenon

Raynaud’s phenomenon is a fairly common condition characterised by an exaggerated reaction to cold temperatures. It mainly affects the hands and feet but can also affect the nose, ears and lips. Raynaud’s phenomenon is named after the doctor who first described the condition.

‘Resistant bugs’: antibiotic resistance and multidrug-resistant organisms 

This page explains about 'resistant bugs': antibiotic resistance and multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) and why this has become a worldwide public health issue. It explains how these organisms are passed on and how they can be treated. It also explains about things we are doing at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to reduce the chance of them spreading.