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Subglottic stenosis

The subglottis is just below the vocal cords at the bottom of the voice box (larynx). It is the narrowest part of a child’s airway. Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the subglottic airway. Doctors do not know how many children are affected by subglottic stenosis, but we see around 200 children with the condition each year at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Vocal cord paralysis

The vocal cords, also known as vocal folds, sit at the top of the windpipe (trachea). They are two folds of tissue stretched across the voice box (larynx). They vibrate, adjusting the flow of air from the lungs, to produce speech sounds. Vocal cord paralysis is the term used when there is weakness in one or both vocal folds stopping them moving as they should.

PHACES association

PHACES association is the name given to a collection of features that are often seen together. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the medical condition PHACES association (previously referred to as PHACES syndrome) and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Richard Hewitt

Richard Hewitt is a Paediatric Otolaryngologist Ear Nose and Throat (ENT),  Head & Neck and Tracheal Consultant. He is the Director of the National Service for Severe Tracheal Disease and The Great Ormond Street "Tracheal Team" and the Co-Director of the Great Ormond Street Hospital & University College Hospital Foetal Airway Service.

Richard is committed to the safe, effective and efficient care of children and was awarded the Great Ormond Street Hospital "Best Surgical Consultant Award" in March 2017