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Kelly procedure

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the Kelly procedure used to strengthen the sphincter at the bladder neck and what to expect when your child is admitted to GOSH for the operation.

Cystoscopy

A cystoscopy is a procedure at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) that lets a doctor look inside and around your bladder using a cystoscope (a tube containing a small camera and a light). 

Cystoscopy

This page explains about having a cystoscopy and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to have this procedure.

Administration of Non-Cytotoxic Medication via an Intracerebroventricular Reservoir

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the administration of non-cytotoxic injection or infusion via an Intracerebroventricular (ICV) reservoir at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). 

This guideline is to be used for the administration of cerliponase alfa/BMN190 and may need to be adapted for administration of other ICV medications. 

For intrathecal or ICV administration of cytotoxic drugs please see the clinical guideline; Intrathecal cytotoxic chemotherapy: administration via a lumbar puncture or Ommaya reservoir.

Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Nephrostomy

This page explains about a nephrostomy and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to have this procedure/treatment.

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

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