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Angiography

Angiography is a procedure at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) that shows us the blood vessels and organs inside your body. It uses a dye that shows up on x-rays and gives a picture of how the blood is flowing around your body.

Angiography

Angiography is a procedure that allows doctors to look at blood vessels in great detail using x-rays. This page explains about an angiography procedure, what it involves and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to have it.

Central venous access devices (long term)

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance on the care and use of long term Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD) including advice on dealing with any problems encountered. For the purpose of this guideline, devices that are required to remain insitu greater than a month will be considered a long term CVAD.

Note: While this guideline refers to the 'child' throughout, all activities are applicable to young people

Administration of Non-Cytotoxic Medication via an Intracerebroventricular Reservoir

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the administration of non-cytotoxic injection or infusion via an Intracerebroventricular (ICV) reservoir at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). 

This guideline is to be used for the administration of cerliponase alfa/BMN190 and may need to be adapted for administration of other ICV medications. 

For intrathecal or ICV administration of cytotoxic drugs please see the clinical guideline; Intrathecal cytotoxic chemotherapy: administration via a lumbar puncture or Ommaya reservoir.

Warfarin

Warfarin is an anticoagulant medication (known as a ‘blood thinner’) that will slow down blood clotting to prevent abnormal blood clots from developing or worsening. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the anticoagulant (blood thinner) medication warfarin, how it should be taken and how it will be monitored. 

Arterial lines

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance in the use of arterial lines at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Multiple sclerosis

When young people are told that they have a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) they usually have lots of questions. Some young people may have never heard of the condition and most will never have met anybody else who has this condition. It can be difficult to know where to look for information and how to find answers to their questions.

PHACES association

PHACES association is the name given to a collection of features that are often seen together. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the medical condition PHACES association (previously referred to as PHACES syndrome) and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.