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Skin biopsy: punch method

The skin is complex with an array of functions. It is the body’s largest organ, protecting the deeper tissues and organs from mechanical damage, chemical damage, bacterial damage, ultraviolet radiation and thermal damage. The skin aids in regulating body temperature, in excretion of urea and uric acid and also synthesis of vitamin D (Marieb 2012). 

Gastrostomy management

A gastrostomy is a feeding tube that is inserted directly into the stomach either surgically under direct vision (open or laproscopic), endoscopically (with a camera), or radiologically (x-ray guidance). A gastrostomy tube allows the delivery of supplemental nutrition and medications directly into the stomach. It also provides a mechanism to drain gastric contents if required. In order for gastrostomy feeding to be successful the child or young person must have a functioning gastrointestinal tract.

Head injuries

Head injuries may involve the scalp, the skull, the brain or its protective membranes.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the effects that a head injury can have on a child. It also sets out the treatment and care of any complications following a head injury.

PHACES association

PHACES association is the name given to a collection of features that are often seen together. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) provides information about the medical condition PHACES association (previously referred to as PHACES syndrome) and what to expect when your child comes to GOSH for assessment and treatment.

Haemangiomas

A haemangioma is a collection of small blood vessels that form a lump under the skin. They are sometimes called ‘strawberry marks’ because the surface of a haemangioma may look a bit like the surface of a strawberry.This page explains about haemangiomas and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment. Although this leaflet focuses on the problems haemangiomas can develop, it is always important to remember that 80 per cent of haemangiomas do not develop any problems at all, and in those that do, the problems may not be severe.

Gallstones

Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operatoin to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).