Search Results

Tracheal stenosis

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains tracheal stenosis, how it can be treated and what to expect when your child has treatment. This page mainly concentrates on the ‘long segment’ type of tracheal stenosis and its treatment.

Diaphragmatic hernia

The diaphragm is a curved muscle that separates the contents of the chest from the abdomen (tummy). Diaphragmatic hernias occur when the diaphragm does not form completely, leaving a hole.This page explains about diaphragmatic hernias, how they are treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.

Headache

Headaches affect people of all ages – many adults remember having headaches as children. Headache in children can occur on its own (primary disorder) or as a result of another condition.

Kelly procedure

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the Kelly procedure used to strengthen the sphincter at the bladder neck and what to expect when your child is admitted to GOSH for the operation.

Research and publications

The Louis Dundas Centre for Children’s Palliative Care supports an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to research, education and clinical practice for children and young people with life-limiting conditions and life-threatening illnesses and their families.

Angiography

Angiography is a procedure that allows doctors to look at blood vessels in great detail using x-rays. This page explains about an angiography procedure, what it involves and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to have it.

Research and publications

We have an ongoing programme of research, and you or your child may be invited to take part in a research project whilst under the care of the team. This is always entirely voluntary, and whether you choose to participate or not, your clinical care will not be affected. Any information gathered may be used anonymously for research purposes to improve our understanding and lead to better treatments for other children and families in the future.