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Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

Open tip rhinoplasty for children with craniofacial disorders

A rhinoplasty is an operation to reshape the bone and cartilage in the nose. An open tip rhinoplasty is one where incisions are made to access inside the nostrils. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the open tip rhinoplasty operation for children with craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.


A cystoscopy is a procedure at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) that lets a doctor look inside and around your bladder using a cystoscope (a tube containing a small camera and a light). 


A haemangioma is a collection of small blood vessels that form a lump under the skin. They are sometimes called ‘strawberry marks’ because the surface of a haemangioma may look a bit like the surface of a strawberry.This page explains about haemangiomas and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment. Although this leaflet focuses on the problems haemangiomas can develop, it is always important to remember that 80 per cent of haemangiomas do not develop any problems at all, and in those that do, the problems may not be severe.

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.


Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operation to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).

Undescended testicles

This is when the child’s testicles are not in their usual place in the scrotum. Generally, only one of the testicles is affected, but on rare occasions, both testicles fail to travel to the scrotum. This page explains about undescended testicles, how they can be treated and what to expect when the child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Closed spinal dysraphism

In early development, the brain and spinal cord start as a tube-like structure called the ‘neural tube’ that is open at either end. These openings close within the first weeks of pregnancy, and the neural tube continues to grow and fold, eventually forming the brain and spinal cord.

Kelly procedure

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the Kelly procedure used to strengthen the sphincter at the bladder neck and what to expect when your child is admitted to GOSH for the operation.

Shwachman-Diamond syndrome 

Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a rare condition treated at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) which affects the pancreas, bone marrow and skeleton. Only 200 or so people have been diagnosed with this condition worldwide. It affects all races and ethnic groups equally and is more common in males than females but more research is needed to understand why.