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Medication overuse headache

Medication overuse headache (MOH) develops and gets worse with frequent use of any medication treatment for headache or migraine. It is also known as ‘rebound headache’. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of medication overuse headache and where to get help.

Autoimmune enteropathy

Autoimmune enteropathy is a rare condition affecting young babies causing severe long-lasting diarrhoea. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of autoimmune enteropathy and where to get help.

Bone scans

A bone scan is used at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to show the structure of your child’s bones. It can show up any problem areas, such as infection or fractures. It can also show areas of new or overactive bone growth.

Gastrostomy management

A gastrostomy is a feeding tube that is inserted directly into the stomach either surgically under direct vision (open or laproscopic), endoscopically (with a camera), or radiologically (x-ray guidance). A gastrostomy tube allows the delivery of supplemental nutrition and medications directly into the stomach. It also provides a mechanism to drain gastric contents if required. In order for gastrostomy feeding to be successful the child or young person must have a functioning gastrointestinal tract.

Arterial lines

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance in the use of arterial lines at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Kaposiform haemangioendothelioma 

Kaposiform haemangioendothelioma (KHE) is a rare vascular (blood vessel) growth that may involve the skin and/or internal organs. It usually appears at birth or soon afterwards and in the early stages can be confused with other types of birthmark, such as an infantile haemangioma (also known as a haemangioma of infancy). Although it may be referred to as a tumour, it is not cancerous and does not spread to other parts of the body.