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Cardiac anaesthetic

The anaesthetic team consists of a consultant (or specialist) anaesthetist, sometimes assisted by a junior anaesthetist, and an anaesthetic assistant, usually a nurse. An anaesthetist is a doctor who makes your child go to sleep and stay pain-free during an operation. They will stay with your child for the whole operation.

Skin biopsy: punch method

The skin is complex with an array of functions. It is the body’s largest organ, protecting the deeper tissues and organs from mechanical damage, chemical damage, bacterial damage, ultraviolet radiation and thermal damage. The skin aids in regulating body temperature, in excretion of urea and uric acid and also synthesis of vitamin D (Marieb 2012). 

Ketogenic diet

The ketogenic diet (KD) is a therapeutic diet, which has been shown to improve seizure control in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, and is used in some patients with metabolic conditions for example, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1) and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH).

Central venous access devices (long term)

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance on the care and use of long term Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD) including advice on dealing with any problems encountered. For the purpose of this guideline, devices that are required to remain insitu greater than a month will be considered a long term CVAD.

Note: While this guideline refers to the 'child' throughout, all activities are applicable to young people

Epilepsy surgery: invasive monitoring for epilepsy surgery, nursing management

This guideline is intended to guide and facilitate the care of patients under the care of the clinical teams at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH). It has been approved by the Guideline Approval Group and is for use by staff of all disciplines and levels in these health care teams. The guidance contained here in is not intended to replace individual assessment and personalised treatment of the patient.

Surgery for epilepsy

Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) has had a programme for surgery for treating epilepsy in children since 1992. GOSH has the facilities needed for the investigations, tests and treatment your child may need. These facilities are specifically for children and the specialists who use them have many years’ experience of children with epilepsy.

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