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Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the two doctors who described it in the mid-20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and where to get help.

Conditions we treat

The Craniofacial Unit at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is one of four supra-regional funded centres in England. Our multidisciplinary team diagnoses and treats all forms of craniosynostosis as well as other conditions affecting the skull and face. 

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Open tip rhinoplasty for children with craniofacial disorders

A rhinoplasty is an operation to reshape the bone and cartilage in the nose. An open tip rhinoplasty is one where incisions are made to access inside the nostrils. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the open tip rhinoplasty operation for children with craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia

Cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia is a type of craniosynostosis. The name describes the parts of the skull and face affected. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of cranio-fronto-nasal dysplasia (also known as cranio-fronto-nasal dysostosis) and where to get help.

Carpenter syndrome

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Carpenter syndrome (also known as acrocephalopolysyndactyly type 2 or ACPS II) and where to get help. Carpenter syndrome is a type of craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described the condition.

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome and where to get help.

Muenke syndrome

Muenke syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the mid-1990s. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Muenke syndrome (also known as FGFR3 associated craniosynostosis or P250arg mutation) and where to get help.