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MIBG scan

An MIBG scan is used to look for uncontrolled or abnormal cell growth in the body. It works by injecting a substance called an isotope into your child’s veins. The MIBG scan is named after the chemical ‘iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine’ or MIBG for short, to which the isotope is attached.

MAG3 scans

This page explains about the MAG3 scan on your child’s kidneys, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

DMSA scan

This page explains about the DMSA scan on your child’s kidneys, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the scan.

Head injuries

Head injuries may involve the scalp, the skull, the brain or its protective membranes.This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the effects that a head injury can have on a child. It also sets out the treatment and care of any complications following a head injury.

Multiple sclerosis

When young people are told that they have a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) they usually have lots of questions. Some young people may have never heard of the condition and most will never have met anybody else who has this condition. It can be difficult to know where to look for information and how to find answers to their questions.

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare neurological (brain) condition characterised by episodes of optic neuritis (inflammation or swelling of the optic nerve), transverse myelitis (inflammation or swelling of the spinal cord), together with one or more other diagnostic criteria including in some cases the presence of a specific antibody (AQP4).This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and where to get help.

Immunoglobulin therapy

This booklet has been produced by the PID UK Medical Advisory Panel and Patient Representative Panel in conjunction with Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Great North Children’s Hospital. It provides information on immunoglobulin therapy (Ig therapy) to help answer the questions parents may have about this form of treatment for children and young people affected by primary immunodeficiency (PID).The information should not, however, replace advice from a clinical immunologist.

Reveal LINQ™ recording devices

Reveal LINQ™ devices are heart monitors about the size of a memory stick that continually record your heart’s activity over long periods of time. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about your Reveal LINQ™ recording device and what to expect when you come to GOSH to have one fitted.

Gallstones

Gallstones are stone-like formations found in the gallbladder. They can vary significantly in size, shape and consistency, and they can be present without causing any problems at all. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about gallstones, what causes them and how they can be treated using an operatoin to remove the gall bladder (laparoscopic cholecystectomy).

Ajmaline provocation test

This page explains about ajmaline provocation tests, what is involved and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for the test. An ajmaline provocation test is carried out to diagnose a specific condition called Brugada syndrome.