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Types of medicines

Most medicines come in a variety of types or formats. Be aware, though, that some medicines (particularly rare or unusual ones) only come in one type. Also, some may be more effective in one type than another.

Neuropathic pain medicines

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about medicines used to treat children and young people with neuropathic pain  – pain caused by the nerves sending wrong signals to and from the brain. At GOSH, we mainly use amitriptyline, gabapentin and pregabalin, although other medicines are available.

It is important that you should also read the information provided by the pain relief manufacturer, however our information relates specifically to children and young people and so may differ.

Skin biopsy: punch method

The skin is complex with an array of functions. It is the body’s largest organ, protecting the deeper tissues and organs from mechanical damage, chemical damage, bacterial damage, ultraviolet radiation and thermal damage. The skin aids in regulating body temperature, in excretion of urea and uric acid and also synthesis of vitamin D (Marieb 2012). 

Diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions

This information should be read in conjunction with any patient information leaflet provided by the manufacturer.

This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes diazoxide and chlorothiazide suspensions, which are usually prescribed together. It explains how they are given and some of their side effects. Each person reacts differently to medicines so your child will not necessarily suffer every side effect mentioned. If you have any questions or concerns, please ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist or telephone one of the contact numbers.

Services we provide

Pharmacy is defined as the study of medicines. It involves studying how medicines are discovered, developed and made. It also covers how medicines work in the body to prevent or treat disease, and how active ingredients can be made in to medicines.

Iloprost

Iloprost is known as a prostaglandin. It acts by imitating a naturally occurring substance in the body called prostacyclin. It is prescribed at GOSH to treat pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the blood vessels in the lungs). It works by lowering blood pressure by widening the blood vessels in the lungs.

Lanreotide injections

Lanreotide is used to treat persistently low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) caused by the body producing too much insulin (hyperinsulinism). This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes lanreotide injections, how they are given and some of its side effects.

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