Search Results

Types of medicines

Most medicines come in a variety of types or formats. Be aware, though, that some medicines (particularly rare or unusual ones) only come in one type. Also, some may be more effective in one type than another.

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome / dancing eye syndrome (OMS/DES)

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS), also known as dancing eye syndrome (DES) or Kinsbourne syndrome, is a rare neurological condition which develops over days or weeks in early childhood. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and where to get help.

Services we provide

Pharmacy is defined as the study of medicines. It involves studying how medicines are discovered, developed and made. It also covers how medicines work in the body to prevent or treat disease, and how active ingredients can be made in to medicines.

Venous sclerotherapy

Venous sclerotherapy is a procedure used at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to treat venous malformations. Venous malformations are made up of extra veins that have no use and cause problems. A medicine is injected into the veins, which irritates them encouraging them to shrink.

Orbital box osteotomy

Orbital box osteotomy is an operation used to correct abnormal eye socket shape or placement. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called orbital box osteotomy, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Fronto-orbital remodelling

Fronto-orbital remodelling is an operation to reshape the bones at the front of the skull and above the eye sockets to correct an abnormal head shape. It also enlarges the space within the skull to allow the brain to grow and develop and is used to treat craniofacial disorders. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.

Generalised severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa (EB)

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about generalised severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa (previously called Herlitz junctional EB) and how it can be managed. It also contains suggestions for making everyday life more comfortable and contact details for further information and support. This information sheet explains about the generalised severe junctional form of EB. 

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders.

Open tip rhinoplasty for children with craniofacial disorders

A rhinoplasty is an operation to reshape the bone and cartilage in the nose. An open tip rhinoplasty is one where incisions are made to access inside the nostrils. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the open tip rhinoplasty operation for children with craniofacial disorders. It explains how to prepare your child for surgery as well as what to expect in hospital afterwards.