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Ileostomy

An ileostomy is a surgically formed opening in the ileum, which is the last part of the small bowel before it connects onto the large bowel (colon). The ileum is brought to the surface of the abdomen as an opening called a stoma. Watery diarrhoea passes through the stoma and is collected in a small plastic bag, called an ileostomy bag. An ileostomy can be temporary or permanent.

Special handling requirements for oral cytotoxics and immunosuppressant medicines

Cytotoxic medicines are used to kill or damage abnormal cells. There are many different kinds with many different uses. This information from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) describes how oral cytotoxic and immunosuppressant medicines should be given. It also provides advice on how to handle these medicines safely.

When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

When your child is admitted to the intensive care units at GOSH

PICU (Seahorse), NICU (Dolphin) and CICU (Flamingo) are units for babies, children and young people requiring intensive care. This page explains a little about the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Cardiac Intensive Care (CICU) at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). We hope that this will help you at this difficult time.

Skin biopsy: punch method

The skin is complex with an array of functions. It is the body’s largest organ, protecting the deeper tissues and organs from mechanical damage, chemical damage, bacterial damage, ultraviolet radiation and thermal damage. The skin aids in regulating body temperature, in excretion of urea and uric acid and also synthesis of vitamin D (Marieb 2012). 

If you see it, say it – raising concerns about your child

While everyone at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is an expert in their field, you are the expert in your child. You will know better than us if they are not behaving as they usually do or seem different in some way. Studies have shown that caregivers are often the first people to spot changes in the health of their child, even when in a clinical environment.

Distraction therapy

When a child or young person shows discomfort by crying or shouting, it is not only distressing for them, but also parents and caregivers, as well as the staff attempting treatment. Children and young people can be helped through painful or difficult procedures using distraction therapy. This information sheet explains about distraction therapy and how it is used at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Post mortem examinations 

We know this is a very difficult time for you and your family and it is hard to be asked to make decisions about further examinations of your child. Unfortunately, these decisions often need to be made quickly and we want you to be able to make an informed decision about what can happen next. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about examination after death (post mortem examinations), what will happen and which decisions you will need to make.

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