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Reducing exposure to cryptosporidial infection: information for families with an immune-compromised child

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is for families with a child who is thought to be at particular risk from cryptosporidial infection. We hope that it will help you to understand something about the infection and advise on ways in which you can minimise the risk of acquiring the infection. The advice in this information is not applicable to children, young people and adults with a normal immune system.

When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

Barium 

Barium sulphate is a thick, white liquid that shows up well on x-rays. It is used in various diagnostic tests, such as Upper GI contrast studies and Contrast enemas. It is also used to highlight parts of the digestive system for certain interventional radiology procedures.

Epilepsy surgery: invasive monitoring for epilepsy surgery, nursing management

This guideline is intended to guide and facilitate the care of patients under the care of the clinical teams at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH). It has been approved by the Guideline Approval Group and is for use by staff of all disciplines and levels in these health care teams. The guidance contained here in is not intended to replace individual assessment and personalised treatment of the patient.

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