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Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the two doctors who described it in the mid-20th century. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and where to get help.

Landau Kleffner syndrome

Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare form of epilepsy occurring in children, usually between the ages of three and nine years, that affects the child’s ability to understand and use language. All children with LKS suffer from abnormal electrical brain waves particularly during sleep and some will have obvious epileptic seizures. Children with LKS often have additional difficulties with behaviour, social interaction, motor skills and learning.

Treacher-Collins syndrome

Treacher-Collins syndrome is a congenital (present at birth) condition affecting the bones and tissues in the face. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Treacher-Collins syndrome (also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis) and where to get help.

Carpenter syndrome

This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Carpenter syndrome (also known as acrocephalopolysyndactyly type 2 or ACPS II) and where to get help. Carpenter syndrome is a type of craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described the condition.

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome and where to get help.

Muenke syndrome

Muenke syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the mid-1990s. This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Muenke syndrome (also known as FGFR3 associated craniosynostosis or P250arg mutation) and where to get help.