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When a child dies

This guideline is intended to supplement the resources found in the 'When a Child Dies' (WACD) purple box located in every ward, which gives detailed information on the care of a child after death and, additionally, the ongoing care and attention that the child's family will require (Rationale 1).

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Tell us how we're doing

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we try to achieve the highest standards in our clinical care and also in the services we provide for children, young people and families. We want to exceed your expectations so we try to improve what we do and how we do it all the time. 

Central venous access devices (long term)

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance on the care and use of long term Central Venous Access Devices (CVAD) including advice on dealing with any problems encountered. For the purpose of this guideline, devices that are required to remain insitu greater than a month will be considered a long term CVAD.

Note: While this guideline refers to the 'child' throughout, all activities are applicable to young people

Bone marrow biopsy

The purpose of this guideline is to provide guidance about bone marrow biopsies at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). 

Note: While this guideline refers to the ‘child’ throughout, all activities are applicable to young people.

Our School Offer image - Hospital School

Our School Offer

The Children’s Hospital School Offer sets out in one place information about our school and the way in which we support children and young people with a wide range of Special Educational Needs/Disabilities. 

MEG scans

The brain works by a series of nerve impulses, which cause electrical signals within the brain. These signals (also called brainwaves) can be recorded through the scalp using an electroencephalogram (EEG). The electrical signals also produce weak magnetic fields, which can be measured through the skull and scalp using a magnetoencephalogram (MEG) scan.

Research

The clinical team at GOSH works closely with the research department at the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit (BBSU) at the UCL Institute of Child Health.