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Refeeding guidelines for children and young people with feeding and eating disorders admitted to the Mildred Creak Unit at Great Ormond Street Hospital

Clinical guideline from Great Ormond Street Hospital for the recognition, prevention and treatment of the refeeding syndrome in children and young people admitted in the Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health who have experienced recent starvation. 

Bear Ward

Bear Ward is for children and young people with cardiac (heart) conditions. Some children stay here after surgery and others come for other types of treatments and tests.

Neuromuscular disorders: prophylaxis and treatment guidelines for calcium and vitamin D for children and young people with neuromuscular disorders in the UK

The purpose of this guideline is to provide information on prophylaxis and treatment guidelines for calcium and vitamin D for children and young people with neuromuscular disorders in the UK.

NOTE: We review our guidelines regularly and this guideline is now past its review date. The content of the guideline below may not reflect the most recent evidence based practice. Please use with caution.

Coagulation factors

Coagulation factors are proteins, which in the blood, cause clotting. The factors are manufactured either from human blood (plasma derived) or genetic engineering (recombinant). Advice should be sought from a Consultant Haematologist prior to any decision to prescribe and administer coagulation factors.

Eagle Ward

Eagle Ward is for children and young people with kidney problems such as kidney failure, patients on dialysis or those having a kidney transplant.

Treating and reducing the risk of pressure ulcers after leaving hospital

Our skin is the most important barrier against infection so we need to look after it carefully. Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, people who are unwell develop pressure ulcers. At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we recognise that children can develop pressure ulcers too. This information sheet explains about the steps you can continue to take at home to reduce the risk of your child developing a pressure ulcer. It also explains how to manage a pre-existing pressure ulcer at home.

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