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Browse our photo gallery to learn about some of the characters who have helped shape Great Ormond Street Hospital's history.

Your child is having an MRI scan using 'feed and wrap' technique

An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses a magnetic field rather than X-rays to take pictures of your child’s body. The MRI scanner is a hollow machine with a tube running horizontally through its middle. ‘Feed and wrap’ is a technique used with young babies instead of sedation or general anaesthesia. Generally, babies tend to fall asleep after a feed, so we take advantage of this and scan them while asleep.

Facial bipartition with or without using a rigid external distraction (RED) frame

Facial bipartition is an operation to reshape the front portion of the skull, face and upper jaw to correct an abnormal head shape. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains about the operation called facial bipartition with or without rigid external distraction (RED) frame, which is used to treat craniofacial disorders.

Port wine stains

A port wine stain is a vascular birthmark caused by abnormal development of blood vessels in the skin. A port wine stain is sometimes referred to as a capillary malformation. This page explains about port wine stains and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital for treatment.

Suction

Suction is used to clear retained or excessive lower respiratory tract secretions in patients who are unable to do so effectively for themselves. This could be due to the presence of an artificial airway, such as an endotracheal or tracheostomy tube, or in patients who have a poor cough due to a variety of reasons such as excessive sedation or neurological involvement. 

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