Search Medical Conditions

Search medical conditions A-Z 

Anaemia

Anaemia is a very common condition where the number of red blood cells or the amount of haemoglobin in red blood cells is less than normal. Iron deficiency anaemia is a specific type of anaemia caused by a lack of the mineral iron in the body. Iron is important in the formation of haemoglobin so a reduced iron level causes a reduced haemoglobin level in the blood.

Anal fissure

Anal fissures are tiny tears in the skin around the anus and can be painful. They usually develop as a side effect of constipation. Constipation is the condition where a person passes faeces (poo) less frequently than usual and the poo is harder, drier and painful to pass.

Anorectal anomaly

An anorectal anomaly is a disorder affecting the anus and the rectum, the last part of the digestive system.This page explains about anorectal anomaly, how it can be treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Anorexia nervosa

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder. It is most common in teenagers and young adults, although it can occur in children as young as seven or eight years old as well as adults of all ages. Around 90 per cent of young people diagnosed with anorexia nervosa are female, however it also affects males.

Antley-Bixler syndrome

This page from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Antley-Bixler syndrome and where to get help. Antley-Bixler syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctors who first described it.

Aortic arch obstruction

Our Cardiorespiratory Unit regularly refers to information published by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) when explaining aortic arch obstruction to our patients and their families. More information on aortic arch obstruction can be found in their coarctation of the aorta factsheet.

Aortic regurgitation

Aortic regurgitation occurs when the aortic valve (linking the left ventricle to the aorta) does not close properly when the heart contracts. This means blood leaks back into the left ventricle, which then has to work harder to pump the extra blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. This can lead to the enlargement and thickening of the ventricle wall.

Aortic valve stenosis

The aortic valve is a one-way valve between the left pumping chamber (ventricle) of the heart and the major blood vessel taking blood to the body (aorta). Aortic stenosis (AS) describes a condition where the aortic valve is smaller or tighter than it should be.

Apert syndrome

Apert syndrome is a type of complex craniosynostosis named after the doctor who first described it in the early 20th century. This information sheet from Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) explains the causes, symptoms and treatment of Apert syndrome and where to get help.

Aplastic anaemia

Aplastic anaemia is a serious condition affecting the blood, where the bone marrow and stem cells do not produce enough blood cells. It is also called bone marrow failure and can happen suddenly (acute) or develop over a period of time (chronic). This page explains about aplastic anaemia, how it is treated and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for treatment.