Procedures and treatments

Preparing a child for a procedure or treatment can be an anxious occasion. Great Ormond Street Hospital have produced a number of factsheets to help explain what will happen and what to expect.

Procedures and treatments search

Search for information on procedures and treatments at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Short-term parenteral nutrition

Parenteral nutrition is used at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) when the gut is unable to absorb enough nutrition to enable your child to grow and develop normally. A liquid solution that contains nutrients (vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, proteins and fats) needed for growth and development is given directly into a vein.

Skin biopsy (punch method)

A punch skin biopsy is a short procedure to remove a small piece of skin for examination under a microscope or to grow cells. These cells can be tested for abnormalities of the DNA or to show whether a specific chemical reaction can or cannot take place.This page explains about a skin biopsy (punch method) and what to expect when your child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) to have this procedure.

Sleep study

A sleep study is a test to see what happens to your body when it is asleep. When we’re asleep, we aren’t usually aware of what is happening with our basic functions. For example our breathing can become laboured, we can snore or make funny movements.

Spinal surgery at GOSH

At Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), we have developed a pathway for children and young people having spinal surgery. Spinal surgery is a complex procedure, so we want you to understand the benefits and risks of the operation so you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead. This page explains what will happen from your child’s initial clinic appointment through to discharge, which clinicians you may meet and what to expect.

Splenectomy

A splenectomy is an operation to remove the spleen. It can be carried out using keyhole surgery or traditional open surgery. Most splenectomies at GOSH are carried out using keyhole surgery.